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Mother's Day Presidential Proclamations (since 2000)

As the American President, on May 9, 1914, President Woodrow Wilson made an official announcement proclaiming Mother's Day as a national holiday that was to be held each year on the 2nd Sunday of May. The tradition of giving a Mother's Day Proclamation continues to this day with each President of the United States doing so every year. Here we have brought for you a series of Mother's Day proclamations from the year 2000 to the year last. Read these heart-warming Mother's Day proclamations by American Presidents. If you like them, click here to refer this page to your friends or acquaintances and share with them the spirit of Mother's Day. Wish you a Happy Mother's Day from TheHolidaySpot.

Presidential Proclamation -- Mother's Day, 2015
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

Each May, Americans dedicate a day to honor the remarkable women who strive and sacrifice all year to ensure ours is a Nation where all things are possible. Whether married or single, LGBT or straight, biological, adoptive, or foster, mothers are the bedrocks of our lives and the foundation of our society. They are our first friends and teachers, inspiring us to reach great heights and supporting us no matter the challenges we face or the paths we choose. Today, we come together to celebrate the women who raised us and who love us unconditionally -- who do whatever it takes to set us on the road to success and want nothing more than for us to lead happy, healthy lives.

Our Nation's mothers are breadwinners, community leaders, and pillars of family. For generations, they have blazed new paths -- from Seneca Falls and Selma to the boardroom, the laboratory, and the forefronts of our military conflicts -- opening up new possibilities and widening the circle of opportunity. Today, these pioneers show us what is possible for ourselves and our country. They are our Nation's innovators, tireless workers, engines of economic growth, and drivers of progress. And through their example, they teach our future dreamers and doers about the value of hard work, compassion, service, and personal responsibility.

President Barack Obama giving Mother's Day Proclamation

Today, women are nearly half of the American workforce, and as a Nation, we must ensure our policies reflect this reality because no woman should have to choose between being a productive employee and a responsible mother. All women deserve equal pay for equal work and a living wage, and as President, I have fought tirelessly to advance these commonsense measures. I continue to call for increased workplace flexibility and access to paid leave, including paid sick days, and I have proposed a plan that would make quality child care available to every middle-class and low-income family with young children. I remain committed to tearing down the remaining barriers to mothers' full and equal participation in our economy and society -- because when mothers succeed, America succeeds and policies that benefit women and working families benefit us all.

We owe so much to our mothers, and they deserve policies that support them, as well as our profound love and gratitude. On Mother's Day, we give thanks to our mothers who lift us up every day. Let us pay respect to those who continue to offer us generous love and patient counsel and hold fast to the memories of all who live on in our hearts.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 10, 2015, as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

BARACK OBAMA

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Presidential Proclamation -- Mother's Day, 2014
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

For over a century, Americans have come together to celebrate our first friends and mentors, our inspirations and constant sources of strength. Our mothers are breadwinners, community leaders, and pillars of family. They pioneer scientific discoveries, serve with valor in our Armed Forces, and represent our Nation in the loftiest halls of Government. Whether biological, adoptive, or foster, they play a singular role in our lives. Because they so often put everything above themselves, on Mother's Day, we put our moms first.

Through centuries of organizing, marching, and making their voices heard, mothers have won greater opportunities than ever before for themselves and their children. Their victories brought our Nation closer to realizing a sacred founding principle -- that we are all created equal and each of us deserves the chance to pursue our own version of happiness.

Today, there are more battles to win. Working mothers increasingly provide the majority of their family's income, yet even now, discrimination prevents women from earning a living equal to their efforts. My Administration is proud to fight alongside women as they push to close the gender pay gap, shatter glass ceilings, and implement workplace policies that do not force any parent to choose between their jobs and their kids. Because when women succeed, America succeeds.

By words and example, mothers teach us how to grow and who to become. They shape lasting habits that can lead to healthy living and lifelong learning. They demonstrate what is possible when we work hard and apply our talents. Without complaint, they give their best every day so they and their children might achieve the scope of their dreams. Today, let us once again extend our gratitude for our mothers' unconditional love and support -- during years past and in the years to come.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 2014, as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this  ninth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.

BARACK OBAMA

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Presidential Proclamation -- Mother's Day, 2013
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

Today, sons and daughters all across America come together to honor the women who raised them. Whether single or in partnership, foster or adoptive, mothers hold a special place in our hearts. For many of us, they are our first caretakers and our first teachers, imparting the early lessons that guide us growing up. And no matter the challenges we face or the paths we choose, moms are there for their children with hope and love -- scraping and sacrificing and doing whatever it takes to give them a bright future.

That work has often stretched outside the home. In the century since Americans first came together to mark Mother's Day, generations of women have empowered their children with the courage and grit to fight for change. But they have also fought to secure it themselves. Mothers pioneered a path to the vote, from Seneca Falls to the 19th Amendment. They helped write foundational protections into our laws, like freedom from workplace discrimination and access to affordable health care. They shattered ceilings in business and government, on the battlefield and on the court. With every step, they led the way to a more perfect Union, widening the circle of opportunity for our daughters and sons alike.

That history of striving and success affirms America's promise as a place where all things can be possible for all people. But even now, we have more work to do before that promise is made real for each of us. Workplace inflexibility puts a strain on too many mothers juggling their jobs' needs with those of their kids. Wage inequality still leaves too many families struggling to make ends meet. These problems affect all of us -- and just as mothers pour themselves into giving their children the best chance in life, we need to make sure they get the fairness and opportunities they deserve.

On Mother's Day, we give thanks to proud, caring women from every walk of life. Whether balancing the responsibilities of career and family or taking up the work of sustaining a home, a mother's bond with her child is unwavering; her love, unconditional. Today, we celebrate those blessings, and we renew them for the year to come.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 12, 2013, as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh.

BARACK OBAMA

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Presidential Proclamation -- Mother's Day, 2012
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

Mothers are cornerstones of our families and our communities. On Mother's Day, we honor the remarkable women who strive and sacrifice every day to ensure their children have every opportunity to pursue their dreams.

Our Nation first came together to celebrate Mother's Day on May 11, 1913, with the introduction of a House Resolution requesting President Woodrow Wilson, Members of Congress, and officials across the Federal Government wear white carnations in honor of America's mothers. Today, we continue to mark Mother's Day by paying tribute to the women who shape our characters and set our families up for success. Through their example, our children learn the principles of hard work, compassion, service, and personal responsibility. Through their encouragement and unconditional support, they instill the confidence and values so vital to our children's success.

Mothers raise children under an array of circumstances, and many work long hours inside and outside the home balancing myriad demands. Mothers are leaders and trailblazers in every part of our society -- from classrooms to boardrooms, at home and overseas, on the beat and on the bench. We celebrate the efforts of all our Nation's mothers, and we recognize that when more households are relying on women as primary or co-breadwinners, the success of women in our economy is essential to the success of our families, our communities, and our country. That is why I created the White House Council on Women and Girls as one of my first acts in office -- to ensure we integrate the needs of women and girls into every decision we make. I was proud to sign the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which continues to help women secure equal pay for equal work, and my Administration continues to promote workplace flexibility so no mother has to choose between her job and her child. And because of the Affordable Care Act, women finally have more power to make choices about their health care, and they have expanded access to a wide variety of preventive services such as mammograms at no additional cost.

Today, let us pay respect to mothers across America by embracing the women who continue to guide and inspire us, and by holding fast to the memories of those who live on in our hearts.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 13, 2012, as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth.

BARACK OBAMA

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2011
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

As our society has changed, so have the challenges facing women raising families. Many American women are raising children at home while caring for an elderly parent, holding down two jobs, serving as the sole parent in a family, or defending our country overseas as a service member. Our Nation's mothers not only look after our needs and teach us to be compassionate and responsible, but also manage households, build careers, and improve our neighborhoods and communities. While the roles and responsibilities of mothers have evolved, their guidance and care remains as strong and constant as ever.

On Mother's Day, we celebrate the extraordinary importance of mothers in our lives. The bond of love and dedication a mother shares with her children and family is without bounds or conditions. Whether an adoptive mom or grandmother, mother or partner, the women who raise us show us that no hurdle is too high, and no dream is beyond our reach. As sons and daughters, we show our gratitude for the women in our lives who care for us, shape our values, and set us on the path to a limitless future.

Throughout our history, mothers have made remarkable sacrifices for the well-being of their loved ones. Nearly a century ago, Anna Jarvis, who had suffered the loss of her beloved mother, campaigned with many other Americans to make Mother's Day a recognized holiday and pay respect to all women raising children. Today, we continue to celebrate the influence, love, and nurturing our mothers provide in our lives and in our national life.

To support the parents who are raising tomorrow's leaders, my Administration is committed to doing all we can to create jobs and economic opportunities for families across America. We are striving to help mothers in the workplace by enforcing equal pay laws and addressing workplace flexibility as families balance the demands of work, child and elder care, and education. My budget strengthens the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit to help families afford the cost of quality childcare. The tax-cut package we passed last December extended expansions of the Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit, providing a tax cut for 15.7 million families with about 29.1 million children. The Affordable Care Act gives women more access to health care and better resources to protect the health of their families by requiring new insurance plans to cover wellness benefits for children, ending the exclusion of pre-existing conditions by insurance companies, and extending parents' health coverage for young adults up to age 26. First Lady Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" initiative is also providing mothers with helpful tools to support their children's healthy growth.

Mothers are the rocks of our families and a foundation in our communities. In gratitude for their generous love, patient counsel, and lifelong support, let us pay respect to the women who carry out the hard work of motherhood with skill and grace, and let us remember those mothers who, though no longer with us, inspire us still.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 8, 2011, as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express their love, respect, and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.

BARACK OBAMA

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2010
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

Generations of mothers have labored tirelessly and selflessly to support and guide their children and families.  Their loving, devoted efforts have broadened horizons for their children and opened doors of opportunity for our Nation's daughters and granddaughters.  On Mother's Day, we pay tribute to these women who have given so much of themselves to lift up our children and shape America's character.

Julia Ward Howe, who wrote the words for the song The Battle Hymn of the Republic, led early efforts to establish a day honoring the influence of mothers on our lives and communities.  In the ensuing decades, many Americans rallied to support this cause, including Anna Jarvis.  After the loss of her own mother, Anna helped spur the nationwide institution of Mother's Day we celebrate each year.

From our first moments in this world and throughout our lives, our mothers protect us from harm, nurture our spirits, and encourage us to reach for our highest aspirations.  Through their unwavering commitment, they have driven and inspired countless acts of leadership, compassion, and service across our country.  Many mothers have struggled to raise children while pursuing their careers, or as single parents working to provide for their families.  They have carried the torch of trailblazers past, leading by powerful example and overcoming obstacles so their sons and daughters could reach their fullest potential.

Whether adoptive, biological, or foster, mothers share an unbreakable bond with their children, and Americans of all ages and backgrounds owe them an immeasurable debt.  Nurturing families come in many forms, and children may be raised by two parents, a single mother, two mothers, a step-mom, a grandmother, or a guardian.  Mother's Day gives us an opportunity to celebrate these extraordinary caretakers, mentors, and providers who have made us who we are.  As we honor today's mothers, we also reflect upon the memory of those who have passed, and we renew our commitment to living the values they cultivated in us.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 9, 2010, as Mother's Day.  Let us express our deepest love and thanks to our mothers and remember those who, though no longer with us, inspire us still.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand ten, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth.

BARACK OBAMA

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2009
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

The time-honored tradition of recognizing mothers grew out of the imagination of a few bold women. Julia Ward Howe, composer of The Battle Hymn of the Republic, urged mothers to advocate for peace through a day dedicated to them. After her own mother passed away, Anna Jarvis sought to recognize the great influence mothers have on society. These efforts led to the recognition of mothers through a Congressional Resolution and President Woodrow Wilson's proclamation of the first Mother's Day in 1914. Today, we proudly carry forward this tradition in honor of mothers, the special women whose love and lessons profoundly impact our lives.

Mothers are the bedrock of the American family vital to their children's growth and happiness and to the success of our country. Children's lives are shaped by their mothers, whose care provides the foundation for their development. Mothers instill the values and confidence that help define their children's character and self-esteem, and offer a guiding clarity of spirit. Mothers are role models, teachers, and sources of unconditional support. There is no substitute for the bond of love between mother and child, and nothing is more worthy of reverence.

Across America, mothers raise children under an array of circumstances. They may care for a child with the help of a spouse, family members, and friends, or they may do this job alone as a single parent. They may be biological mothers, adoptive mothers, or foster mothers, but all open their hearts to their children and nurture them through their life journey.

Caring for children also means putting food on the table, ensuring their needs are met, and staying involved in their daily lives. Women often work long hours at demanding jobs and then return home to a household with myriad demands. Balancing work and family is no easy task, but mothers across our Nation meet this challenge each day, often without recognition for their hard work and dedication. The strength and conviction of all mothers including those who work inside and outside the home are inspiring. They deserve our deepest respect, admiration, and appreciation.

A mother's love is a cherished blessing, for it is selfless, unconditional, and true. This Mother's Day, let us honor our mothers who continue to inspire us, and remember those whose loving spirits sustain us still.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 10, 2009, as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express their love, respect, and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-third.

BARACK OBAMA

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2008
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

On Mother's Day, we honor the grace, wisdom, and strength of our mothers, and we celebrate the special bonds shared between mothers and their children.

Mothers work tirelessly to help their children build healthy and successful lives. Through their positive examples and countless acts of kindness, mothers teach the values of generosity and compassion and the importance of family and community. As President Ronald Reagan said, "From our mothers, we first learn about values and caring and the difference between right and wrong." By providing a nurturing environment where their children can grow in confidence and character, mothers lay the foundation for the next generation of Americans to realize their full potential.

Our Nation is grateful for the sacrifices mothers make every day and for the unconditional love they give their children. We are especially thankful for the mothers who support their sons and daughters serving in our Armed Forces and for the mothers who bring honor to the uniform of the United States by defending our freedom at home and abroad.

Every child blessed with a mother's love has been given one of life's great gifts. On this Mother's Day, we recognize the extraordinary contributions America's mothers make to their children, their families, and our country.

To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. May God bless mothers across America on this special day and throughout the year.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 2008, as Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to show their gratitude and love to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children, families, and communities. I call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-second.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2007
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

Motherhood is one of the most cherished and valued roles in our society. On Mother's Day, we pay tribute to these dedicated women who give unconditional love and guidance to their children.

A mother's work requires extraordinary patience and compassion, and her example influences the formation of young lives. President Gerald Ford wrote that "there is no undertaking more challenging, no responsibility more awesome, than that of being a mother." Mothers make great sacrifices and serve as caregivers and role models to help their children embrace dreams and aspirations. From these remarkable women, children learn character and values, the importance of giving back to their communities, and the courage to realize their potential. Mothers of military personnel provide support and encouragement while their sons and daughters defend our freedom in places far from home, and many mothers bring honor to the uniform of the United States while working to lay the foundations of peace for generations to come.

The bond between mothers and their children is one defined by love. As a mother's prayers for her children are unending, so are the wisdom, grace, and strength they provide to their children. On Mother's Day, we are reminded of the great debt we owe to our Nation's mothers for their love and devotion to their sacred duty.

To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. Throughout the year, and especially on this day, America's sons and daughters honor our mothers and celebrate their selfless gift of love.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 13, 2007, as Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to show their gratitude and love to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children, families, and communities. I call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-first.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2006
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

On Mother's Day, we honor our mothers and pay tribute to their devoted work and selfless gift of love.

America's mothers are women of determination and vision. They serve as caregivers and guides, helping to build the foundation for our children's success and nurturing them as they grow and explore the great promise of our Nation. Through their mothers' examples, children come to understand the virtue of kindness, the blessing of compassion, and the importance of principle. A mother's support encourages children to make right choices, set high goals, and become good citizens. A mother's love inspires children to achieve their full potential and strengthens the character of our country. The commitment and love of mothers reflect the best of America.

On this special day, we remember the many mothers whose sons and daughters serve in harm's way. The determination and courage of these women demonstrate the spirit of our Nation, and America will always be grateful for their unfailing devotion. We also recognize the dedication of the many mothers who serve in America's Armed Forces. These brave women protect the safety and security of our Nation and help ensure a peaceful future for our children.

To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. May God bless all mothers across our country on this special day, and throughout the year.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 14, 2006, as Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to show their gratitude and love to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children and communities. I call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand six, and of the Independence of the United

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2005
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

On Mother's Day, we pay tribute to the extraordinary women whose guidance and unconditional love shape our lives and our future. Motherhood often allows little time for rest. As President Theodore Roosevelt said of the American mother in 1905, "Upon her time and strength, demands are made not only every hour of the day but often every hour of the night." President Roosevelt's words ring as true today as they did 100 years ago.

The hard, perpetual work of motherhood shows us that a single soul can make a difference in a young person's future. As sources of hope, stability, and love, mothers teach young people to honor the values that sustain a free society. By raising children to be responsible citizens, mothers serve a cause larger than themselves and strengthen communities across our great Nation.

Mothers are tireless advocates for children. In our schools, mothers help to ensure that every child reaches his or her full potential. In our communities, they set an example by reaching out to those who are lost and offering love to those who hurt. A mother's caring presence helps children to resist peer pressure, focus on making the right choices, and realize their promise and potential.

In an hour of testing, one person can show the compassion and character of a whole country. In supporting their sons and daughters as they grow and learn, mothers bring care and hope into others' lives and make our Nation a more just, compassionate, and loving place.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. It is my honor to do so. May God bless mothers across our great land on this special day.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 8, 2005, as Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to express their love, appreciation, and admiration to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children, families, and communities. I also call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-ninth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2004
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

President Theodore Roosevelt once said, "The mother is the one supreme asset of national life; she is more important by far than the successful statesman, or business man, or artist, or scientist." Today, mothers continue to be an important part of our national character. On Mother's Day, we honor the women whose steadfast love and wisdom have made America a better place.

During the Civil War, Julia Ward Howe, author of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," proposed renaming July 4 as Mother's Day and a day dedicated to peace. Anna Reeves Jarvis also began working for a similar holiday and sponsored a Mother's Friendship Day in her hometown to reunite families divided by the war. It was not until 2 years after her mother's death that her daughter, Anna M. Jarvis, started the campaign for the observance of Mother's Day in the United States. By 1911, Mother's Day was observed in nearly every State of the Union, and in 1914, responding to a joint resolution of the Congress, President Woodrow Wilson officially designated Mother's Day a national observance.

Motherhood is a rewarding and often difficult job. A mother is a child's first teacher and affects a child's life like few others can. Effective mothers can inspire their sons and daughters to love themselves and others, work hard, make healthy choices, serve causes greater than self, and achieve their dreams. Mothers who protect, teach, and nurture their children with all their hearts strengthen their families and help build a better future for our country.

This Mother's Day, we express our heartfelt thanks to our mothers for their unconditional love and guidance. We take time to recognize the many mothers who are supporting their brave sons and daughters in the Armed Forces, and the many others who are themselves serving proudly in defense of America's freedom and security. The service and sacrifice of these women reflect the best of our Nation. They and their loved ones are in our thoughts and prayers.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. In honor of all of our Nation's mothers, I am pleased to do so.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 9, 2004, as Mother's Day. I commend mothers for the important contributions they make to our society and encourage all Americans to express their love, gratitude, and respect for mothers, and to honor their mothers on this day and throughout the year.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-eighth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2003
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

On Mother's Day, we honor the dedicated and caring women who are devoted to their families and committed to improving the world their children will inherit. Our first President, George Washington, said that his mother was "the most beautiful woman I ever saw. All I am I owe to my mother." America owes much of its goodness and strength to mothers, including adoptive mothers, stepmothers, and foster mothers.

Mother's Day began as a day of love and friendship, designed to help heal families divided across battle lines during the Civil War. In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed a resolution officially establishing Mother's Day to honor the role of women in the family. On Mother's Day, 2003, we carry on the tradition by recognizing our mothers for their strength and compassion. We also recognize them for showing unconditional love and teaching positive values.

As we honor our mothers on this special day, we celebrate their contributions to the character of our next generation of leaders. And we remember the lessons our mothers have taught us: That it is better to give than to receive, that we must love our neighbors as ourselves, and that service to others brings joy.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. It is my honor and privilege to do so again.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 2003, as Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to express their love, respect, and appreciation to mothers everywhere for their contributions to their children, families, communities, and our Nation. I also call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2002
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

Mothers are central to the success of the American family. Their love, dedication, and wisdom touch countless lives every day in every community throughout our land. And their love and guidance of children help to develop healthy and spiritually sound families.

President John Quincy Adams once said, "All that I am my mother made me." President Abraham Lincoln believed, "All that I am or hope to be I owe to my angel mother. I remember my mother's prayers and they have always followed me. They have clung to me all my life." These statements are just as true for the millions of Americans who credit their mothers for helping to successfully shape their lives.

Millions of American mothers are at work in communities across the United States, improving the lives of their families and their neighbors through countless acts of thoughtful kindness. They energize, inspire, and effect change in homes, schools, governments, and businesses throughout our country. By their example, mothers teach their children that serving others is the greatest gift they can give.

Nearly 100 years ago, Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia helped establish the first official Mother's Day observance. Her campaign to organize such a holiday began as a remembrance of her late mother, who, in the aftermath of the Civil War, had tried to establish "Mother's Friendship Days" as a way to bring unity and reconciliation to our Nation. In 1910, West Virginia became the first State officially to observe Mother's Day. The idea caught on quickly; for just over a year later, nearly every State in the Union had officially recognized the day. In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first Mother's Day proclamation, stating that the observance serves as a "public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country."

On this special day and throughout the year, our mothers deserve our greatest respect and deepest appreciation for their love and sacrifice. I especially commend foster mothers for answering my call to service, volunteering their time and their hearts to aid children in need of a mother's love. To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May as "Mother's Day" and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance, which, as the son of a fabulous mother, I am pleased and honored to do again this year.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 12, 2002, as Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to express their love, respect, and gratitude to mothers everywhere for their remarkable contributions to their children, families, communities, and our Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2001
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

No matter what direction life takes us, a mother's love and guidance are a tremendous blessing that help us to grow up as stable, responsible, and caring individuals. As nurturers, teachers, and protectors, mothers' unconditional affection helps their children to blossom into mature adults. In partnership with fathers, mothers play a critical role in building healthy families.

Anna M. Jarvis is credited with influencing the Congress in 1914 to establish an official Mother's Day as a tribute to her beloved mother and to all mothers. She conceived of the day as a time when children could formally demonstrate respect for their mothers and reinforce family bonds.

Mothers who teach us right from wrong and to love our neighbors merit our deepest gratitude and appreciation. Beyond their more traditional role in rearing children, many mothers also face responsibilities outside the home as members of the workforce. At the same time, they may be caring not only for their biological or adopted children but also for stepchildren or foster children.

Many American families are now headed solely by women, and these women shoulder enormous responsibilities. For the good of their families and our Nation, we must strive to provide support and assistance to those mothers, such as, opportunities for training and employment; early childhood education for their young ones; and safe, affordable, and high-quality childcare. But fathers must also remain committed and involved in the lives of their children. By fulfilling their financial and nurturing responsibilities, fathers help ensure the well-being of their children and ease the burden on those women who carry the primary responsibility of caring for their families.

Whatever their circumstances, mothers demonstrate daily how their devotion, strength, and wisdom make all the difference in the lives of their children. To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 13, 2001, as Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to honor the importance of mothers and to celebrate how their love and devotion are crucial to the well--being of children, families, and our society.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Presidential Mother's Day Proclamation 2000
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

We are living in a new century and a new age, where the revolution in communications technology is changing almost every aspect of human experience. But even in this new era of global connections, there is perhaps no more powerful link than the love between mother and child.

That bond is a child's first experience of the world, and that love is often the deepest source of the self-esteem, courage, and character that children need to thrive. Mothers are their children's first teachers; they are their inspiring role models whose generosity, compassion, and unconditional acceptance give children the strength and encouragement to reach their fullest potential and to make their own contributions to their families, communities, and country.

Even in this age of spectacular technological advances, mothers still face the daunting challenges of balancing the responsibilities of home and work and meeting the changing emotional, educational, and physical needs of their children. Mothers strive to provide a safe and nurturing environment. They help their children navigate the often stormy waters of an increasingly complicated world. They teach their children to approach conflict with words, not violence; to cherish the richness of our diversity and reject prejudice in any form; and to believe in themselves.

Each year we set aside this special day to acknowledge all that our mothers--whether biological or foster, adoptive or stepmothers--have given us. It is a time to reflect on all we have gained from their unwavering care, guidance, and sacrifice, and a time to express openly our deep gratitude and abiding love. The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as "Mother's Day" and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 14, 2000, as Mother's Day. Whether we are able to share this special day with our mothers in person or are blessed only with our memories of their love, in our hearts they remain with us always. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers on this day, to speak the words of appreciation we too often neglect to say, and to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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